Windrush Day 2018

Sorry for the gap between posts – it’s been a hectic few months.

Anyway, I had to return this month because there’s an important anniversary coming up for the black British community on June 22nd – the 70th anniversary since the arrival of the infamous Empire Windrush.

HMT_Empire_Windrush_FL9448

Now we all know, and I hope this blog has shown it too, that black people were significantly present in, and contributing to, the UK for centuries before the Windrush came to these shores, but obviously it is only fitting that we recognise this momentous occasion and celebrate the bravery of those first arrivals and the contribution they and their children have made to the UK ever since.

I have posted before about my mum taking the decision to come to the UK when she was just 19 years old to train as a nurse in 1967, and how I couldn’t imagine leaving everything I knew as a teenager for a life in a foreign country.

The 500 West Indians on board the Windrush will have faced a similar mixture of fear and trepidation – excitement at travelling to the ‘Mother Land’ but apprehension about leaving their loved ones and the life they had built for an unknown future.

Then of course, we all know that when they arrived, even though they’d been invited by the UK to come to rebuild the country after the horrendous damage caused by WWII, they were met with racism, anger and discrimination from every tier of society.

But of course they’d also come to the UK for personal reasons – to have a better life and possibly to help their families back home by sending remittances – so despite the hostility and ignorance of the British, many of them would stay and make a significant contribution to the UK financially and culturally.

I recently read on the Black History Month website that the Windrush was actually on its way back when it journeyed to the UK from Jamaica to Tilbury in 1948.

On the first leg of its voyage it actually went out to the Caribbean with hundreds of servicemen who had fought for Britain in the Second World War and were now returning to their islands with wounds and medals. I’d never heard this aspect of the Windrush story before and that’s an example of how history can be manipulated and key sacrifices forgotten.

Anyway, I’m glad the descendants of the people on the Windrush and others are making sure that those first few hundred West Indian migrants are remembered on June 22nd.

I won’t go into the recent scandal of deportations and mistreatment of the Windrush generation by the current Conservative government on this blog, but needless to say I believe it is our duty to make sure that our community’s contribution over hundreds of years, not just starting with Windrush, is never whitewashed.

So I urge everyone in the UK to salute Windrush Day 2018 by attending as many of the planned events as possible.

This is a chance for all of us to publicly show that we are proud of our ancestors and the journey they undertook; the courage they demonstrated; and the determination they displayed.

Further information – Windrush Day 2018

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Happy New Year

Hello everyone and Happy New Year!

I hope 2018 is already exceeding your expectations and providing you with lots of hope for the future.

The motivation for this post just came to me when I saw an advert on Facebook, and I felt that I had to share it because the product fits in with what I am trying to do with this site.

The advert was for black history flash cards – a new resource offered by Urban Intellectuals for black children and adults, to inform them about their rich cultural and intellectual history which, as I have said countless times before, is not often recognised.

On the website it claims that this 52-card series is “designed to combat the miseducation and suppression of Black achievements around the globe… (and) gives a strong foundation of the many untold stories and unknown figures that have given shape, colour, and definition to the worlds of academia, science, civil rights, education, the arts, and more.”

I know if I had children I’d definitely buy them these cards, which are filling a shameful gap left by education systems around the world, because it’s obviously essential to educate our youth about black pioneers in many fields who have paved the way, (while sometimes facing seemingly insurmountable odds), for us to follow.

When our children know their history they will become a confident, inspired and empowered generation who will know their worth and know that there is no limit to what they can do.

I think the cards are a great idea and there are plans for more so I hope our community and others will support the initiative – spread the word.

Click this link to take a closer look at the black history flash cards.

Slave reparations: How much is enough?

Recently I wrote an article for Black Ballad magazine about the arguments for and against slave reparations.

I wanted to share the link to the story on this blog because I feel like the slave trade is often the elephant in the room which some people don’t want to talk about.

I’ve said before that my education in a UK state school in west London was wholly inadequate when it came to teaching me about black people and their contribution to the UK for centuries, and I think an ultra-sensitivity around the slave trade may be partly to blame for that.

The fact is that slavery is a massive part of our history as black people and quite frankly, we have nothing to be ashamed of about it so we should see it as our duty and privilege to know of it, and to teach our children all about it as well.

Anyway, please read the article (you have to subscribe to get 3 free stories a month) and let me know what you think in the comments section.

Black Ballad: We need to change the conversation around slave reparations

A history of black Britain

I’m constantly coming across black British people, especially my generation from the 1970s, who say they were not taught enough about their own culture in school.

Obviously we were educated in the UK, so to some extent you can’t expect to get the same history lessons (or perspective) as someone taught in the Caribbean or Africa, but I think most people would accept that we (as in every state school pupil in England) seem to learn a lot about American history and European history alongside British history but there was (and probably still is) very little time spent, if any, on black ancestry.

It was only after I went to live in Barbados when I was 33 and tried to fit in to a different culture, albeit the home of my parents and immediate ancestors, that I really realised how ‘British’ I was.

I also became acutely aware of my limited knowledge of Caribbean history and especially in terms of how it fit in and contributed to the development of the British ‘Empire’. I think I have been actively trying to make up for this deficit ever since.

Anyway, I recently came across a course which would probably fill in some of the history blanks for me and many other black Britons.

It’s being advertised by Goldsmiths University in London and I just wish that it had been around when I was a teenager and I also wish that I had time to go on it now (I’m currently researching my MA dissertation while working three jobs so barely have time to eat).

It’s called Black Britain: A History of Struggle and Triumph

goldsmiths

Copyright: Goldsmiths University

It’s running every Tuesday for 6 weeks from January 17th and will run again in the Summer at a cost of £150.

According to the website accompanying the course, it is for “anyone seeking to explore and share their experiences of the history and cultural roots of Black people and ‘Black culture’ in London.”

It adds that participants will “learn how it came to be that Britain was a key destination for migrating workers from the Caribbean in the 1960s …The course will highlight the contribution of people of African descent to the rich history and culture of Britain and will explore film, photography, literature and biography that will generate great conversation.”

I think it sounds like an interesting six weeks and I’m happy to promote it to anyone who visits my site and might be interested – don’t forget to tell your friends.

Hopefully, one day soon I may go on a course like this, or something similar, because any method that’s striving to ‘complete’ our education as black British citizens, has to be welcome.

I would also argue that people from other races should also go along if it is something that they are interested in because we all learn, and hopefully advance, when we know more about each other.

Calling all black Londoners

So I must start by apologising for not posting on this blog for months – life has just been too hectic and I have not had the time I would like to devote to communicating on the site. But I hope I can make some more time in the future, so thank you if you are still out there and interested in what I am posting on the contribution of black Caribbean people to the UK.

So in my first post back, I would like to draw your attention to an event I saw advertised on Twitter which fits in nicely with this blog as it’s a lecture series examining the black community in London before 1948.

Obviously some people reading this will not be based in London so can’t take part but even if this message just highlights the work of Black History Studies, which is running the series, then I will be happy.

I’ve said it before but it’s worth repeating that it is essential for everyone to know more about their history and especially in this day and age when more than ever people must be made aware of who they are and where they are from, so that they don’t become lost and detached from their roots and susceptible to brainwashing and manipulation.

Anyway please check out the course and Black History Studies when you get a chance – and check back here for more posts on black people in Britain which I promise I will produce more of in the future.

Black Londoners: The history of black people in London before 1948 – a short course

A historic voyage of discovery

The history of black Caribbean people in the UK is long and varied, as I hope I have been demonstrating through the posts on this blog, but there will always be one event that is forever linked with our past in this country and that is the arrival of the Empire Windrush in June 1948.

On that ship were over 490 passengers from Jamaica and Trinidad which was the largest number of black Caribbean people to come to Britain at one time.

The people that arrived on the Windrush were brave, bold and enterprising and the others that followed shortly afterwards would undoubtedly thank them for taking that first step and showing the way.

My video montage posted below (with captions) charts the arrival of the Windrush and highlights some of the achievements of those on board as well as their descendants.

The Windrush voyage was history in the making and its arrival nearly 70 years ago shows how far Caribbean people have come.

“A journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step (Lao Tzu)”.

References / further reading:

http://www.voice-online.co.uk/article/empire-windrush-jamaica-sails-british-history

http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/british/modern/windrush_01.shtml

http://www.historytoday.com/richard-cavendish/arrival-ss-empire-windrush

http://www.bl.uk/learning/timeline/item107829.html