The doctor will see you now

So as mentioned in the previous post I am currently busy trying to settle back into life in the Caribbean and continue my career as a freelance journalist. One of the best things about being my own boss, at the moment, is being able to write about issues which are important to me and then see these stories published on websites or in magazines etc which I am morally and professional in tune with, such as Black Ballad.

This week I’ve had a piece published on another platform based in the UK which is designed for women of colour and that’s called Melan Mag. This online magazine has a similar vision to Black Ballad – it was launched last year and is being run by Joy Joses who I was also privileged to interview for my MA in International Journalism.

Joy comes from a Caribbean background and it was heartening to listen to her story about why she felt Melan Mag was needed now, especially in terms of filling a creative gap, which the mainstream media has created (either deliberately or through wanton neglect), by providing content for black women in the UK who are under-represented and under-served.

Melan Mag’s website adds that it was “launched to serve as the online BFF for the UK woman of colour. Our mission is to offer a regular supply of articles, features and inspiration for smart, stylish black women…Melan Mag will feature news, information and pieces on notable black role models, fashion, health and beauty, travel and lifestyle, all with an appreciation for the black person, culture and experience.”

It is so exciting to be able to write stories which I am passionate about, which will hopefully inspire others, and for audiences which look like me and have had similar experiences growing up black in Britain.

On Friday (July 7) my first piece was published on Melan Mag about Dr Tilean Clarke – she is an inspirational entrepreneur who is dedicating her life to ensuring that women she engages with can reach their full potential.  Dr Tilean also has a Caribbean background and she grew up on a council estate in Brixton which is where she first uncovered her desire to help people better their lives.

Please read her story and share it with your friends: The doctor will see you now – introducing Dr Tilean

Clive Myrie: Always a story to tell

I found a story this morning on the BBC website that I want to share on this blog. It’s not completely relevant to what this blog is about but I found it fascinating especially as it gave me some insight into a journalist I admire – Clive Myrie.

Clive Myrie

BBC – Clive Myrie on assignment

Myrie was born in Bolton in Lancashire in the 1960s to Jamaican parents and since 1996 he has worked as a foreign correspondent for the BBC. He’s just finished working on a special series of programmes for Panorama called ‘What Britain Wants’ and his episode is about finding work.

The episode will be shown on BBC One at 10.45pm tonight (Mon 16th March) and the promotional coverage on the BBC website features some insightful glimpses into Myrie’s personal story.

It chronicles how his Jamaican uncles joined the Royal Air Force and fought in World War II and goes on to detail why his parents came from the Caribbean to live in the UK and how Myrie learnt, by watching and following their example, the benefits of hard work.

Myrie talks about his parents making sacrifices to look after him and his siblings and you can tell that their courage inspired him to do what he is doing today.

He also goes on to say how much he admired Sir Trevor McDonald when he was growing up and why it was so important to see someone that looked like him on the TV. In an interview with The Independent newspaper Myrie bemoans the fact that there are not enough black people following in Sir Trevor’s footsteps, he says: “You’ve only got to look at the TV screens to see there’s not the kind of representation of black Britons on the screen as one would like.”

But he has made the breakthrough and even though he is now based in Brussels there is no doubt that he is very British and his story is inspirational and certainly adds another strand to the rich tapestry of Caribbean people living in the UK.

Check out Clive Myrie’s story here on the BBC website – http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/resources/idt-02b18d60-92f2-4158-b34b-10c85dae2bc0