Searching for a hero

I’ve been thinking a lot recently about role models probably because I’m realising more and more how important it is for people, especially children, to have someone they look up too, who provides inspiration and motivation and possibly a template for how you want to live your life.

In the black British community most of our role models seem to come from the sport or entertainment world, which is fine, but one of the reasons I created this website was because I wanted to show how many other role models we have to choose from who demonstrate that there is nothing in life we cannot achieve.

The hashtags #blackgirlmagic and #blackboyjoy show how the demand for positive role models seems to be a need among people to enable them to see that there are no boundaries in life, except in the mind, and all obstacles can be overcome with a lot of persistence, dedication and hard work.

So that being said I thought that I would share with you my top five black role models – let me know yours in the comment section.

  1. My mum – she brought my brother and I up by herself on a council estate in Fulham and if I say so myself I think she did a great job.

    My mum enjoying the sunset

    She worked in the NHS for 40 years and sacrificed more than I’ll know so that we never went without.

  2. Dr Maya Angelou – poet, author and civil rights activist – there was nothing Dr Angelou could not do and despite a difficult childhood she made sure that she told her own story and was not defined by her circumstances. As Barack Obama wrote when she died in 2014: “Maya had the ability to remind us that we are all God’s children; that we all have something to offer.”
  3. Sir Trevor McDonald – I can’t imagine how difficult it must have been for Sir Trevor to get his media career off the ground over 50 years ago when racism was even more overt and hateful than it is today. But now he is regarded as one of the best journalists of our time having covered some of the world’s biggest stories and, despite being born in Trinidad, he is a national treasure in the UK.
  4. Rosa Parks – the story of Ms Parks has always fascinated me as I’ve often thought about how tired and exacerbated she must have been with segregation to refuse to get up from her bus seat so that a white passenger could sit down. She wasn’t the first to offer such resistance but her courageous stance became an important rallying symbol for the civil rights movement at the time and inspired countless other people to say ‘enough is enough’.
  5. Nelson Mandela – what more can I say that hasn’t already been said about Mr Mandela.

    Nelson Mandela’s cell on Robben Island

    There are not enough adjectives in the world to cover how much I admire his life and struggle and his ability to forgive his oppressors. I recently visited Robben Island and it really brought home to me how much black people have suffered just to be accepted as equal human beings.

 

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