Searching for a hero

I’ve been thinking a lot recently about role models probably because I’m realising more and more how important it is for people, especially children, to have someone they look up too, who provides inspiration and motivation and possibly a template for how you want to live your life.

In the black British community most of our role models seem to come from the sport or entertainment world, which is fine, but one of the reasons I created this website was because I wanted to show how many other role models we have to choose from who demonstrate that there is nothing in life we cannot achieve.

The hashtags #blackgirlmagic and #blackboyjoy show how the demand for positive role models seems to be a need among people to enable them to see that there are no boundaries in life, except in the mind, and all obstacles can be overcome with a lot of persistence, dedication and hard work.

So that being said I thought that I would share with you my top five black role models – let me know yours in the comment section.

  1. My mum – she brought my brother and I up by herself on a council estate in Fulham and if I say so myself I think she did a great job.

    My mum enjoying the sunset

    She worked in the NHS for 40 years and sacrificed more than I’ll know so that we never went without.

  2. Dr Maya Angelou – poet, author and civil rights activist – there was nothing Dr Angelou could not do and despite a difficult childhood she made sure that she told her own story and was not defined by her circumstances. As Barack Obama wrote when she died in 2014: “Maya had the ability to remind us that we are all God’s children; that we all have something to offer.”
  3. Sir Trevor McDonald – I can’t imagine how difficult it must have been for Sir Trevor to get his media career off the ground over 50 years ago when racism was even more overt and hateful than it is today. But now he is regarded as one of the best journalists of our time having covered some of the world’s biggest stories and, despite being born in Trinidad, he is a national treasure in the UK.
  4. Rosa Parks – the story of Ms Parks has always fascinated me as I’ve often thought about how tired and exacerbated she must have been with segregation to refuse to get up from her bus seat so that a white passenger could sit down. She wasn’t the first to offer such resistance but her courageous stance became an important rallying symbol for the civil rights movement at the time and inspired countless other people to say ‘enough is enough’.
  5. Nelson Mandela – what more can I say that hasn’t already been said about Mr Mandela.

    Nelson Mandela’s cell on Robben Island

    There are not enough adjectives in the world to cover how much I admire his life and struggle and his ability to forgive his oppressors. I recently visited Robben Island and it really brought home to me how much black people have suffered just to be accepted as equal human beings.

 

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First black British TV news presenter

Happy New Year!

I wanted to start 2017 on this blog by writing about my own profession – journalism. If you’ve read the Why create this blog? page, you’ll know that I started this website as part of my MA in International Journalism and now I am writing my dissertation for the course, for which I have decided to research the lack of diversity in the British media and how this is contributing to black Britons creating their own ways to make their voices heard.

Anyway, during the course of my dissertation research I am obviously looking into the history of black people in British media and I came across the surprising news to me, which I wanted to share, that the first black TV news presenter in the UK was not Sir Trevor McDonald or Moira Stuart as I grew up believing but was, in fact, Barbara Blake Hannah.

If you’ve never heard the name before then I am sure you are not alone!

Hannah is a journalist from Jamaica and in the Guardian she set the record straight about her short stint as the pioneering black face for news on British TV in 1968. She writes that she was “appointed one of three on-camera reporters on Thames-TV’s daily evening show, Today with Eamonn Andrews”, in a role that involved interviewing all of the high-profile personalities at the time.

Unfortunately her appearance on TV was relatively short-lived as the producers came under pressure from racists to have her removed, so nine months after her debut her contract was terminated.

Of course her efforts were not in vain though as five years later, in 1973, Sir Trevor made it on to our screens followed not long afterwards by Ms Stuart, and no amount of ignorance was going to stop black people from pursuing journalism careers and making a contribution to the fourth estate after that ball had started rolling.

Hannah later worked for ATV-Birmingham and then BBC-TV’s ‘Man Alive’ before returning to Jamaica in 1972. She has since gone on to have a successful career as a writer and film-maker in the Caribbean.

So now that I am working on my dissertation I have to admit that I am, perhaps naively, actually quite surprised at the lack of diversity in the British media. According to the most recent figures from City University in December 2015 – journalists in the UK are 94% white and 55% male.

How this has come about is a bit of a mystery to me as black people are much better represented in areas which you might think would easily cross over with media, such as the entertainment industry and sport, but for reasons which I hope to explore in my dissertation there are just not many of us working in TV, radio, newspaper or online newsrooms as writers, producers or editors. And of course even fewer in the top echelon and decision-making positions.

I think I’ve said before on this blog that when I was growing up and I decided to be a journalist, my main inspirations were white TV reporters such as Kate Adie and Martin Bell – mainly because I wanted to be a war correspondent – and I never really considered their colour, or whether there were many black journalists or if journalism was a profession that black people could succeed in. I just knew that I wanted to write and tell stories.

However, I hope you’ll agree that it is worrying in a multi-cultural society, when one of its most important and influential sectors does not represent a large proportion of its people, and it does not take a rocket scientist to see the issues around discrimination and marginalisation this might cause now and in the future.

Anyway, I will keep posting on here are much as possible while I study and of course if you have any ideas about black, British people who should feature on the site then I’d be glad to hear about it.

I wish you all a peaceful, happy and prosperous 2017.

Clive Myrie: Always a story to tell

I found a story this morning on the BBC website that I want to share on this blog. It’s not completely relevant to what this blog is about but I found it fascinating especially as it gave me some insight into a journalist I admire – Clive Myrie.

Clive Myrie

BBC – Clive Myrie on assignment

Myrie was born in Bolton in Lancashire in the 1960s to Jamaican parents and since 1996 he has worked as a foreign correspondent for the BBC. He’s just finished working on a special series of programmes for Panorama called ‘What Britain Wants’ and his episode is about finding work.

The episode will be shown on BBC One at 10.45pm tonight (Mon 16th March) and the promotional coverage on the BBC website features some insightful glimpses into Myrie’s personal story.

It chronicles how his Jamaican uncles joined the Royal Air Force and fought in World War II and goes on to detail why his parents came from the Caribbean to live in the UK and how Myrie learnt, by watching and following their example, the benefits of hard work.

Myrie talks about his parents making sacrifices to look after him and his siblings and you can tell that their courage inspired him to do what he is doing today.

He also goes on to say how much he admired Sir Trevor McDonald when he was growing up and why it was so important to see someone that looked like him on the TV. In an interview with The Independent newspaper Myrie bemoans the fact that there are not enough black people following in Sir Trevor’s footsteps, he says: “You’ve only got to look at the TV screens to see there’s not the kind of representation of black Britons on the screen as one would like.”

But he has made the breakthrough and even though he is now based in Brussels there is no doubt that he is very British and his story is inspirational and certainly adds another strand to the rich tapestry of Caribbean people living in the UK.

Check out Clive Myrie’s story here on the BBC website – http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/resources/idt-02b18d60-92f2-4158-b34b-10c85dae2bc0